Life Cycle of a Snake WebQuest
An Internet WebQuest on Life Cycle of a Snake

created by cecilia monta
tice elementary

Introduction | The Task | The Process & Resources | Conclusion | Dictionary.com



Introduction

Your teacher's aunt, the famous herpetologist Professor Slither, just returned from one of her adventures and brought back a treasure to share with your class - four baby snakes! While visiting your class, she receives an emergency phone call asking her to come help take care of a frog invasion in a remote African village. In a panic, she hands the snakes to your teacher and tells her to take care of them until she returns.

Your teacher, being a quick thinker, immediately puts you to work. You have four new baby snakes to take care of, and each one is a different kind! What will you feed them? What kind of habitats do they need? Most importantly, why would anyone want to save snakes? Are they actually important, useful animals?




The Quest

Your teacher has decided to make this snaky situation into an exciting event for the whole school. She wants you to create a snake exhibit to share all that you learn about these interesting reptiles. Your exhibit will include a poster showing the life cycle of a snake, a feeding sign for your snake, and a model of your snake in its natural habitat.

As junior herpetologists, it will be your job to research one of the snakes and create the exhibit. Remember, your main goal is to find out if snakes are important, useful animals.
What are snakes?
Where do they live?
What do snakes eat?
Are all snakes dangerous?
What are the different kinds of snakes?
How are snakes born?
What makes their eggs different from ordinary eggs?
How does mother snake take care of the baby snakes?
How many eggs does mother snake lay at a time?
What is the life span of a snake?
Why is it that some people take care of snakes?
Are snakes important? What are their uses?
What are important things to remember when a snake bite you?






The Process and Resources

In this WebQuest you will be working together with a group of students in class. Each group will answer the Task or Quest(ion). As a member of the group you will explore Webpages from people all over the world who care about Life Cycle of a Snake. Because these are real Webpages we're tapping into, not things made just for schools, the reading level might challenge you. Feel free to use the online dictionary or one in your classroom.

You'll begin with everyone in your group getting some background before dividing into roles where people on your team become experts on one part of the topic.

Phase 1 - Background: Something for Everyone

Step 1 - Learn some snake vocabulary

Your teacher wants to make sure you know the meanings of some words related to snakes. Click here to play a concentration game to learn the meanings of these words:

snake

reptile

habitat

cold-blooded




Step 2 - Create a poster about the life cycle of a snake

Now it is time to learn about the life cycle of a snake. First, print out the graphic organizer. As you learn about the snake life cycle, use the organizer to write down ideas for your poster.

Web site - Snake Life Cycle

Book - Snakes (Nature Watch Series) by Barbara Taylor (You can buy it at Amazon.com)

Create a poster that shows the life cycle of a snake. Make sure it covers five stages and that your poster is colorful.



Step 3 - Choose a snake and create a model of the snake in its habitat.

You need to pick one of the four snakes that Dr. Slither left with your teacher.

Copperhead Rattlesnake Garter Snake Boa Constrictor


Go to the following web sites to learn about the habitat of your snake.

Boa, an Encarta Encyclopedia Article

Rattlesnake, an Encarta Encyclopedia Article

Snakes of Missouri

Create a model of your snake in its habitat using a shoe box. You will need to find the necessary materials (rocks, grass, sand, leaves) to create a habitat where your snake could survive. Use clay, Model Magic, or craft dough to make a model of your snake. Paint it to look like your type of snake and put it in the habitat you created.



Step 4 - Make a feeding sign for your snake.



Go to the following web sites to learn what your snake eats.

The Belize Zoo - Boa Constrictor

Snakes of Missouri

Make a feeding sign for your snake exhibit that tells what your snake eats. You can use a computer program like KidPix, Microsoft Word, Microsoft Publisher, Print Shop to create your sign; or you can create one just using paper and crayons.






Step 5 - So why would anyone want to save snakes?



Many people fear snakes and probably think your teacher and Dr. Slither are crazy for wanting to save four baby snakes. Using the information you have learned so far about snakes and information from the following web site, write a letter as a class to the local newspaper, telling why snakes are important, useful animals.

Snakes: Information for Missouri Homeowners




Step 1 - Learn some snake vocabulary

Your teacher wants to make sure you know the meanings of some words related to snakes. Click here to play a concentration game to learn the meanings of these words:

snake

reptile

habitat

cold-blooded

Now go to Puzzlemaker and make a criss-cross puzzle using your new vocabulary words. (The number of squares should be width 15, height 15, and the square size should be 30.) Print out your puzzle and trade your puzzle with a classmate to see how well you know these snaky words.



Step 2 - Create a poster about the life cycle of a snake

Now it is time to learn about the life cycle of a snake. First, print out the graphic organizer. As you learn about the snake life cycle, use the organizer to write down ideas for your poster.

Web site - Snake Life Cycle

Book - Snakes (Nature Watch Series) by Barbara Taylor (You can buy it at Amazon.com)

Create a poster that shows the life cycle of a snake. Make sure it covers five stages and that your poster is colorful.



Step 3 - Choose a snake and create a model of the snake in its habitat.

You need to pick one of the four snakes that Dr. Slither left with your teacher.

Copperhead Rattlesnake Garter Snake Boa Constrictor


Go to the following web sites to learn about the habitat of your snake.

Boa, an Encarta Encyclopedia Article

Rattlesnake, an Encarta Encyclopedia Article

Snakes of Missouri

Create a model of your snake in its habitat using a shoe box. You will need to find the necessary materials (rocks, grass, sand, leaves) to create a habitat where your snake could survive. Use clay, Model Magic, or craft dough to make a model of your snake. Paint it to look like your type of snake and put it in the habitat you created.



Step 4 - Make a feeding sign for your snake.



Go to the following web sites to learn what your snake eats.

The Belize Zoo - Boa Constrictor

Snakes of Missouri

Make a feeding sign for your snake exhibit that tells what your snake eats. You can use a computer program like KidPix, Microsoft Word, Microsoft Publisher, Print Shop to create your sign; or you can create one just using paper and crayons.






Step 5 - So why would anyone want to save snakes?



Many people fear snakes and probably think your teacher and Dr. Slither are crazy for wanting to save four baby snakes. Using the information you have learned so far about snakes and information from the following web site, write a letter as a class to the local newspaper, telling why snakes are important, useful animals.

Snakes: Information for Missouri Homeowners












Phase 2 - Looking Deeper from Different Perspectives

INSTRUCTIONS:

1. Individuals or pairs from your larger WebQuest team will explore one of the roles below.

2. Read through the files linked to your group. If you print out the files, underline the passages that you feel are the most important. If you look at the files on the computer, copy sections you feel are important by dragging the mouse across the passage and copying / pasting it into a word processor or other writing software.

3. Note: Remember to write down or copy/paste the URL of the file you take the passage from so you can quickly go back to it if you need to to prove your point.

4. Be prepared to focus what you've learned into one main opinion that answers the Big Quest(ion) or Task based on what you have learned from the links for your role.

Reporter

Use the Internet information linked below to answer these questions specifically related to Reporter:

1.Explain and explore the steps in the snake's life cycle.

Time Keeper

Use the Internet information linked below to answer these questions specifically related to Time Keeper:

1. How long does it take the snake to reach the full-grown adult stage.

  • The Time Line - This shows the time line of every stages in the life cycle of the snake

Materials Manager

Use the Internet information linked below to answer these questions specifically related to Materials Manager:

1. Collect all the materials necessary to make the project -- snakes and snake life cycle.

Photographer

Use the Internet information linked below to answer these questions specifically related to Photographer:

1. View and take pictures of real snakes undergoing every stages of its life cycle.

Phase 3 - Debating, Discussing, and Reaching Consensus

You have all learned about a different part of Life Cycle of a Snake. Now group members come back to the larger WebQuest team with expertise gained by searching from one perspective. You must all now answer the Task / Quest(ion) as a group. Each of you will bring a certain viewpoint to the answer: some of you will agree and others disagree. Use information, pictures, movies, facts, opinions, etc. from the Webpages you explored to convince your teammates that your viewpoint is important and should be part of your team's answer to the Task / Quest(ion). Your WebQuest team should write out an answer that everyone on the team can live with.

Phase 4 - Real World Feedback

You and your teammates have learned a lot by dividing up into different roles. Now's the time to put your learning into a letter you'll send out for real world feedback. Together you will write a letter that contains opinions, information, and perspectives that you've gained. Here's the process:

1. Begin your letter with a statement of who you are and why you are writing your message to this particular person or organization.

2. Give background information that shows you understand the topic.

STATE THE TASK / QUEST(ION) AND YOUR GROUP'S ANSWER.

3. Each person in your group should write a paragraph that gives two good reasons supporting the group's opinion. Make sure to be specific in both the information (like where you got it from on the Web) and the reasoning (why the information proves your group's point).

4. Have each person on the team proofread the message. Use correct letter format and make sure you have correctly addressed the email message. Use the link below to make contact. Send your message and make sure your teacher gets a copy.

5. The Poster Presentation will be evaluated using the following rubric:
Click on 'Rubric' link.

Your Contact is: the designated contact




Conclusion

Dr. Slither will be very excited to hear what you and your fellow herpetologists have learned about snakes while she was gone. Even though many people fear these animals, hopefully you now have a better understanding of snakes and their role in our world.

If you would like to learn more about snakes, check out King Cobra. Just for fun, read The Snakeman to hear a story about a boy who loves snakes more than anything!

To wrap up, REMEMBER: Everything has its beginning and its end. But life goes in a cycle--THE CIRCLE OF LIFE. Before a snake dies it lives behind another set of life, to become another adult that will give another new set of life...and so on... and so on.



 created by Filamentality Content by cecilia monta, cmonta@galenaparkisd.com
http://www.kn.sbc.com/wired/fil/pages/weblifecycce.html
Last revised Wed Jun 8 12:02:44 US/Pacific 2005