Picture This: Complete Sentences
An Internet WebQuest on English

created by Ms. Higgins
Cunningham Middle School

Introduction | The Task | The Process & Resources | Conclusion | Dictionary.com



Introduction

Picture this: you and a team of learners are presented with the task of describing an elephant. But instead of looking to an encyclopedia or a zoo exhibit, you are each blindfolded and guided to a real elephant. Each of you touches a different part of the animal: one, the soft and delicate tip of the elephant's trunk; another, the hard tusk of ivory; and a third, the wrinkled hide around the elephant's belly.

Based upon what each of you learned, one thinks an elephant is smooth and soft, another would say an elephant is smooth and hard, while the last would conclude that elephants are rough and soft. What's the truth? When we study complex topics, we are often like the elephant examiners: there's usually a lot more to a topic that we don't learn about after only a quick exploration.

This is particularly true when we use the Internet for our research because many people post their personal opinions or only know a sliver of the whole story. In the following WebQuest, you will use the power of teamwork and the abundant resources on the Internet to learn all about sentence structure. Each person on your team will learn one piece of the puzzle and then you will come together to get a better understanding of the topic.




The Quest

How do you identify a run-on or a comma splice? How do you correct them?




The Process and Resources

In this Webquest, you will learn to identify and correct run-ons (also know as fused sentences) and comma splices. You will also create a Powerpoint, complete with your own digital images, to show off your new found knowledge!

Phase 1 - Background: Something for Everyone

Use the information below to go to Chomp! Get Bytten. Here, you will be led through several exercises. First, click on the green grammar monster. Next, go to TIPS AND RULES. Now, click on RULES FOR FIXING COMMA SPLICES AND FUSED SENTENCES, HTML VERSION. Read UNDERSTAND THE PROBLEM. This will explain what a run on (called a fused sentence here) and a comma splice is. Keep this window open because you will use this again later

Phase 2 - Looking Deeper from Different Perspectives

INSTRUCTIONS:

Individuals from your larger WebQuest team will explore one of the roles below. Read your through your role carefully and make sure that you understand what you are to do. There are two parts:

PART ONE
First, each role will need to become an expert in one strategy to correct run-ons/comma splices. If there is anything that you don't understand, please ask a team member from your team for help.

Before beginning your corrections, you will need to become an expert on one strategy for correcting.
Photographer: Read and know STRATEGY ONE
Director: Read and know STRATEGY TWO
Grammarian: Read and know STRATEGY THREE
Reporter: Read and know STRATEGY FOUR

Once all member have studied their strategies, it is time to come together and teach what you have learned. Each member is to take turns explaining to the group how the strategy works, so that everyone has a working knowledge of all four strategies.

Now, as a group, you are to go to EXERCISES on the Grammar Bytes website. Click on COMMA SPLICES AND FUSED SENTENTENCES, EXERCISE 1, INTERACTIVE EXERCISE. Review together what fused sentences and comma splices are. Together, you will record your answers on the handout that the Grammarian is to pick up from Ms. Higgins. The Reporter is to record all answers on the handout. Include not only the correct answers, but which strategy you would use to correct it. Using a red pen, make those corrections on the handout. Reporter: don't forget to let me know what your group has won! You must turn this handout in to Ms. Higgins before you may begins PART TWO.

***********************************************************
PART TWO
Now, here comes the fun! You will make a Powerpoint presentation to share your new knowledge of correcting run ons and comma splices. Each of you will have a different job to do in order to complete your part of the project. You will all come together at the end to oversee the project as a whole. Job descriptions/assignments are below:

Photographer

Use the Internet information linked below to answer these questions specifically related to the job of Photographer:

http://www.premierphotographer.com/
1. Go to the link above. Study at least 10 different nature photographs. Notice the use of light and angles.

2. Now, devise a plan to take pictures. What will you photograph? You must take 10 pictures. Make them interesting. You MAY NOT take posed pictures of people; rather, you should make your shots candid. At least five of your pictures must be of objects with no people in them. Don't take pictures straight on. Use light and angle to see the object(s) in an unusual way.

3. What are you doing reading this? Get a camera and a hall pass from Ms. Higgins, grab your group members and start snapping! You are the only one who may handle the camera. **Make sure to have someone from another group take a picture of your group. This will be included at the end of your Powerpoint.

  • Premier Photography - A link to an awesome photographer and his incredible nature photographs.

Director

Use the Internet information linked below to answer these questions specifically related to your job as Director:

http://www.geocities.com/fidelio1st/film/Lee.html
1. Go to the link above. Study the biography of Spike Lee. Notice what critics have to say about what makes him a great director.

2. Click on the link to SUMMER OF SAM. Read the first review. Again, notice what the critic has to say about the creation of characters.

3. What are you doing reading this? Follow your director, who has the hall pass, and the rest of your group members. You will walk around the hallways, directing the photographer in how to create the perfect picture. Remember: the photographer will take the pictures. You are there as an adviser to help her/him see things from a different perspective.

  • Spike Lee - Everything you ever wanted to know about Spike Lee~

Grammarian

Use the Internet information linked below to answer these questions specifically related to your job as Grammarian:

http://www.grammardoctor.com/
1. Go to the link above. Click on MEET THE GRAMMAR DOCTOR. Read all about how this former teacher has come to love and resuscitate the English language. Note where she grew up!

http://www.manythings.org/rs/
2. Now, before you can write correctly written sentences, click on the link above to explore the FIVE BASIC SENTENCE PATTERNS. Click on each of the five to see some randomly generated sentences. These will give you ideas on how to write the sentences for your Powerpoint.

3. What are you doing reading this? Follow your director, who has the hall pass, and the rest of your group members. Bring a clipboard, pen, paper, and the handout with the four ways to correct run-ons and commas splices. You will walk around the hallways, composing and dictating sentences that can be used in the Powerpoint for each picture. Remember: the photographer will take the pictures. You are there to begin composing sentences to go along with each photo. Each sentence you compose is to be written two ways: (1) Write the sentence INCORRECTLY, breaking a rule. (2) Write the sentence CORRECTLY, following the rule.
**You should end up writing sentences for 8 out of the 10 pictures taken, NOT including the group photo. This means you will need to use two different pictures with accompying sentences for each of the four strategies. You will dictate your sentences to the Reporter, who will write them down.
***Each of the famous people that your group members studied MUST be included somewhere in your sentences: Pat McNulty, Spike Lee, The Grammar Doctor, and Katie Couric.

Reporter

Use the Internet information linked below to answer these questions specifically related to your job as Reporter:

http://www.answers.com/topic/katie-couric
1. Go to the link above. Read the short biography of one of America's most famous reporters, Kaie Couric.

http://www.geocities.com/couric_fan/
2. Go to the link above. Take a look at the photo gallery. Why do you think that Katie Couric has changed her looks so drastically over the years? How does this relate to your job and fame?

3. What are you doing reading this? Follow your director, who has the hall pass, and the rest of your group members. Bring a clipboard, pen, paper, and the handout with the four ways to correct run-ons and commas splices. You will walk around the hallways, writing down and discussing the sentences that the Grammarian is composing. Remember: the photographer will take the pictures. You are there to begin report/write down sentences to go along with each photo. Each sentence you compose is to be written two ways: (1) Write the sentence INCORRECTLY, breaking a rule. (2) Write the sentence CORRECTLY, following the rule.
**You should end up writing sentences for 8 out of the 10 pictures taken, NOT including the group photo. This means you will need to use two different pictures with accompying sentences for each of the four strategies
***Each of the famous people that your group members studied MUST be included somewhere in your sentences: Pat McNulty, Spike Lee, The Grammar Doctor, and Katie Couric.

Phase 3 - Debating, Discussing, and Reaching Consensus

You have all learned different stategies for correcting run ons. In addition, you have learned a little bit about some famous photographers, directors, grammarians, and reporters. Meet back together as a team and review what you have so far. How do your pictures look? Do they meet the requirements? Do your pictures and sentences match? Are your sentences all written according to the guidelines given? Are your corrected sentences really correct? Are there two pictures with accompying sentences for each strategy?

Phase 4 - Real World Feedback

You and your teammates have learned a lot by dividing up into different roles. Now's the time to put your learning into a Powerpoint you'll present to the rest of the class and the teacher. Together you will create a Powerpoint that contains pictures, incorrect/corrected sentences, and bits of biographical information that you've learned. Here's the process:

1. Begin your Powerpoint with your group photo. Title this with the title of this assignment:
Picture This: Complete Sentences
2. Add slides until you have a total of 10: A title slide, 8 photo slides with sentences, and one conclusion slide.
3. Each slide needs to have the picture with the incorrect and correct sentence that matches the picture.
4. In addition, you may add sounds, graphics, etc., but you may not exceed 20 total slides. Set the timing to manual under 'Set Up Show.'

5. These slides should show your working knowledge of run-ons (fuses sentences) and comma splices, in addition to the knowledge you have learned from reading the biographies.

4. Have each person on the team proofread the slide show. Make sure to view the entire show and agree to any changes to be made. Make sure that a copy of your slide show is saved to both the server and disk. If the computer allows, send an email message to me with the slide show attached by clicking on the link below.

5. Take a look at the Rubric again. How would your group score your Powerpoint? Get a copy of the Rubric to circle where your group believes you are in each area. If you score yourself low, fix the problem before handing in your slide show!

Your Contact is: Ms. Higgins




Conclusion

When you look at only one part of the whole, you can't see the entire picture It's the same for understanding a topic as broad or complex as English: when you only look at one rule, you only know one rule. Now you all know a lot more. Nice work. You should be proud of yourselves! How can you use what you've learned to see beyond the black and white of a topic and into the grayer areas? What other parts of English could still be explored? Remember, learning never stops.



 created by Filamentality Content by Ms. Higgins, shiggins@galenaparkisd.com
http://www.kn.sbc.com/wired/fil/pages/webenglishsc.html
Last revised Wed Jun 8 12:33:25 US/Pacific 2005